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Tag Archives: Board Games

Game Night: 02/23/2012

We played Munchkin this week.

Publisher’s Description

Go down in the dungeon. Kill everything you meet. Backstab your friends and steal their stuff. Grab the treasure and run.

Admit it. You love it.

This award-winning card game, designed by Steve Jackson, captures the essence of the dungeon experience… with none of that stupid roleplaying stuff. You and your friends compete to kill monsters and grab magic items. And what magic items! Don the Horny Helmet and the Boots of Butt-Kicking. Wield the Staff of Napalm… or maybe the Chainsaw of Bloody Dismemberment. Start by slaughtering the Potted Plant and the Drooling Slime, and work your way up to the Plutonium Dragon…

And it’s illustrated by John Kovalic! Fast-playing and silly, Munchkin can reduce any roleplaying group to hysteria. And, while they’re laughing, you can steal their stuff.

Other

Part of the Munchkin series.

In October 2009, Munchkin Holiday Edition was released exclusively for Barnes & Noble: “This special Holiday Edition comes in a box with a unique cover design. It includes all the classic Munchkin cards, in full color for the first time! It also includes the brand new expansion, Waiting For Santa, with 15 new monsters and treasure to add Christmas spice to the Munchkin fruitcake!”

Another variant, Munchkin: Bobblehead Edition, contains both the standard Munchkin card game and the Munchkin Bobblehead. It comes with a red d6 instead of the normal white one.

In May 2010, Steve Jackson Games made the “big announcement.” Starting with the 19th printing, Munchkin will be in full color. At the same time, the rules were expanded and tweaked, and some of the cards were changed slightly. All future printings of the various Munchkin games will be in full color (for those not already so) and will have the new card text and the new rules. The full changelog is available at the Munchkin website. Of note to Munchkin fans, the Kneepads of Allure card, which had been removed in the 14th printing, was added back to the game but modified to be less powerful.

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Posted by on February 28, 2012 in Games

 

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Game Night: December 2, 2011

So Allison was showing off her wedding dress to the girls and the guys went down and played a game of Space Alert.

It’s a cooperative team survival game. Players become crew members of a small spaceship scanning dangerous sectors of galaxy. The missions last just 10 real-time minutes (hyperspace jump, sector scan, hyperspace jump back) and the only task the players have is to protect their ship.

On 2 CDs (or Scenario cards if you don’t have a CD player available) are ten minute long soundtracks that represent central computer announcements about the presence of various threats. These vary from space battleships and interceptors to different interstellar monsters and abominations, asteroids or even intruders and malfunctions on the spaceship. Players have to agree who will take care of which task and coordinate their actions (moving around the ship, firing weapons, distributing energy, using battlebots to deal with intruders, launching guided missiles, etc.) in real time to defend the ship. Only a well-working team can survive 10 minutes and make the jump back to safety.

The game offers several difficulty levels, huge variability and a unique experience for one to five player teams. One mission lasts only about 30 minutes, including setup and evaluation.

So playing Space Alert was Ted, Brett, Eric, Alan and myself.

We played three different games adding to difficulty as we played on. We lost the first game and won the other two.

I think we all had a really good time.

 
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Posted by on December 4, 2011 in Games

 

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Game Day: November 12, 2011

Saturday we had an all day Twilight Imperium game. Marcus hosted the game and we all arrived about 10:00 in the morning. Playing that day was Marcus, Anna, Alan, Brett, Ted and myself.

Twilight Imperium Third Edition is an epic empire-building game of interstellar conflict, trade, and struggle for power. Players take the roles of ancient galactic civilizations, each seeking to seize the imperial throne via warfare, diplomacy, and technological progression. With geomorphic board tiles, exquisite plastic miniatures, hundreds of cards, and introducing a rich set of strategic dimensions that allows each player to refocus their game-plan, the original designer Christian T. Petersen has seamlessly incorporated the better qualities of other recently popular games to improve on the game-play of the original TI, making it at once perfectly well-rounded and pleasantly familiar to experienced gamers.

TI3 is played by at least three players who belong to ten possible alien races, each with their own advantages and quirks. The ‘designer notes’ in the rulebook candidly and humbly acknowledge the inspiration for some of the improvements to the original game. The strategic game-play borrows the governing element from ‘Puerto Rico’ to involve players in an iteratively complex and yet fast-paced game experience with very little downtime. The game map, basic player progress and overall victory are dynamically determined in almost exactly the same way as they are by imaginative players of ‘Settlers of Catan’, while the “Command” system cleverly improves on the ‘oil’ logistical mechanism of ‘Attack’ to both manage turn-based activity and limit the size of armies, uniquely enabling weakened players to bounce back if they play their cards right.

The morning started off slow, Marcus and no coffee, but Anna and brought a coffee cake.  It had been three years since we had played and it was the first time Brett and Ted had played so it took a while for us to start playing.

After about three hours we took a break and ordered pizza (ya pizza 🙂 ).

Like always Twilight Imperium runs long, but around 6:30 we all realized that Ted would win by the end of the round. And so the winner is TED!!!

I hope it’s not another three years that we have to wait to play again.

 
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Posted by on December 4, 2011 in Games

 

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Game Night: November 10, 2011

There was a pretty large turn out for game night this week.

The first game of the night was Werewolf. Playing was Ted, Brett, Sadie, Brian, Tamuna, Kyle, Brian, Anna, Brandi, Allison, Marcus, Eric, and myself.

Werewolves of Miller’s Hollow is a game that takes place in a small village which is haunted by werewolves. Each player is secretly assigned a role – Werewolf, Ordinary Townsfolk, or special character such as The Sheriff, The Hunter, the Witch, the Little Girl, The Fortune Teller and so on… There is also a Moderator player who controls the flow of the game. The game alternates between night and day phases. At night, the Werewolves secretly choose a Villager to kill. During the day, the Villager who was killed is revealed and is out of the game. The remaining Villagers (normal and special villagers alike) than deliberate and vote on a player they suspect is a Werewolf, helped (or hindered) by the clues the special characters add to the general deliberation. The chosen player is “lynched”, reveals his/her role and is out of the game. Werewolf is a social game that requires no equipment to play, and can accommodate almost any large group of players.

Kyle, Sadie and Brian were the werewolves and they won.

After that game we split into three different groups to play games.

7 Wonders was one game and I played with Brandi, Brian W., Tamuna and Brain O.

7 Wonders lasts three ages. In each age, players receive seven cards from a particular deck, choose one of those cards, then pass the remainder to an adjacent player, as in Fairy Tale or a Magic: the Gathering booster draft. Players reveal their cards simultaneously, paying resources if needed or collecting resources or interacting with other players in various ways. (Players have individual boards with special powers on which to organize their cards, and the boards are double-sided as in Bauza’s Ghost Stories.) Each player then chooses another card from the deck they were passed, and the process repeats until players have six cards in play from that age. After three ages, the game ends.

In essence 7 Wonders is a card development game along the lines of Race for the Galaxy or Dominion. Some cards have immediate effects, while others provide bonuses or upgrades later in the game. Some cards provide discounts on future purchases. Some provide military strength to overpower your neighbors and others give nothing but victory points. Unlike Magic or Fairy Tale, however, each card is played immediately after being drafted, so you’ll know which cards your neighbor is receiving and how his choices might affect what you’ve already built up. Cards are passed left-right-left over the three ages, so you need to keep an eye on the neighbors in both directions.

Though the box is listed as being for 3-7 players, there is an official 2-player variant included in the instructions.

Brian O. Won this game.

Anna, Marcus, Allison and Sadie played Munchkin.

Go down in the dungeon. Kill everything you meet. Backstab your friends and steal their stuff. Grab the treasure and run.

Admit it. You love it.

This award-winning card game, designed by Steve Jackson, captures the essence of the dungeon experience… with none of that stupid roleplaying stuff. You and your friends compete to kill monsters and grab magic items. And what magic items! Don the Horny Helmet and the Boots of Butt-Kicking. Wield the Staff of Napalm… or maybe the Chainsaw of Bloody Dismemberment. Start by slaughtering the Potted Plant and the Drooling Slime, and work your way up to the Plutonium Dragon…

And it’s illustrated by John Kovalic! Fast-playing and silly, Munchkin can reduce any roleplaying group to hysteria. And, while they’re laughing, you can steal their stuff.

Ted, Kyle, Brett and Eric played Dungeon Lords.

In Dungeon Lords, you are an evil dungeonlord who is trying to build the best dungeon out there. You hire monsters, build rooms, buy traps and the other usual stuff.

From the publisher’s webpage:

Have you ever ventured with party of heroes to conquer dungeons, gain pride, experiences and of course rich treasure? And has it ever occurred to you how hard it actually is to build and manage such underground complex filled with corridors and creatures? No? Well now you can try. Put yourself in role of the master of underground, your servants, dig complex of tunnels and rooms, set traps, hire creatures and try to stop filthy heroes from conquering and plundering your precious creation. We can guarantee you will look on dark corners, lairs and their inhabitant from completely different perspective!

Dungeon Lords is 90 minute long game for 2 to 4 players. It’s a rather complex game enjoyable mostly for experienced gamers.

Brett won this game.

 
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Posted by on December 4, 2011 in Games

 

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Game Night: October 6th, 2011

It was a very busy night, we had to split up into two groups.

Brandi, Anna, Brian, Allison and myself played Carcassonne.

A clever tile-laying game. The southern French city of Carcassonne is famous for its unique Roman and Medieval fortifications. The players develop the area around Carcassonne and deploy their followers on the roads, in the cities, in the cloisters and in the fields. The skill of the players to best develop the area will determine who is victorious.

It was Brian and Allison’s first time playing this game. Brian and Brandi tied the game with Allison coming second.

The second game our group played that evening was Coloretto. Brian had never played before. I won that game.

This game should not be confused with Coloretto, another game of the same name published in 1993.
Draw a card to play to a row, or take a row — it’s that easy! You score points for collecting cards of the same color.

 

 

The other group consisted of Dannis, Heidi, Brett, Sadie, Marcus and Alan. This group decided to play Power Grid.

Power Grid is the updated release of the Friedemann Friese crayon game Funkenschlag. It removes the crayon aspect from network building in the original edition, while retaining the fluctuating commodities market like Crude: The Oil Game and an auction round intensity reminiscent of The Princes of Florence.
The object of Power Grid is to supply the most cities with power when someone’s network gains a predetermined size. In this new edition, players mark pre-existing routes between cities for connection, and then bid against each other to purchase the power plants that they use to power their cities.
However, as plants are purchased, newer, more efficient plants become available, so by merely purchasing, you’re potentially allowing others access to superior equipment.
Additionally, players must acquire the raw materials (coal, oil, garbage, and uranium) needed to power said plants (except for the ‘renewable’ windfarm/ solar plants, which require no fuel), making it a constant struggle to upgrade your plants for maximum efficiency while still retaining enough wealth to quickly expand your network to get the cheapest routes.
The game ran kinda long, and they did not finish till late. Dannis won the game, but pretty much everyone agreed that a six player game of Power Grid is not that great.

 
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Posted by on October 12, 2011 in Games

 

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