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Monthly Archives: November 2011

Game Night: November 3, 2011

The first game this evening was Bohnanza. Playing was Alan, Ted, Brandi, Olivita, Marta, Brian, Anna and myself.

Bohnanza is the first in the Bohnanza family of games and has been published in several different editions.

As card games go, this one is quite revolutionary. Perhaps its oddest feature is that you cannot rearrange your hand, as you need to play the cards in the order that you draw them. The cards are colorful depictions of beans in various descriptive poses, and the object is to make coins by planting fields (sets) of these beans and then harvesting them. To help players match their cards up, the game features extensive trading and deal making.

The original German edition supports 3-5 players.

The newest English version is from Rio Grande Games and it comes with the first edition of the first German expansionincluded in a slightly oversized box. One difference in the contents, however, is that bean #22’s Weinbrandbohne (Brandy Bean) was replaced by the Wachsbohne, or Wax Bean. This edition includes rules for up to seven players, like theErweiterungs-Set, but also adapts the two-player rules of Al Cabohne in order to allow two people to play Bohnanza.

Ted and Olivita tied the game with 9 points each.

 

The second game we played was Incan Gold.

Ted, Brandi, Brian, Anna and myself played the game.

Incan Gold is a quick, fun and tense game in which you and other adventurers explore an old Incan temple in search of gold and treasure. In each of the five rounds, you secretly choose if you want to continue exploring the temple in search of more treasure or retreat to the safety of your camp with your share of the treasure that has been discovered so far.

Each time that an explorer braves new territory, more treasure or a danger appears. When a second type of the same danger is turned over, all exposed treasure is buried, leaving the remaining adventurers with nothing. Do you flee the dangerous temple with your portion of the treasure that has been uncovered so far or do you venture into the exciting temple in search of more hidden valuables?

After five rounds of exploration, whoever has the most treasure is the ultimate explorer and winner!

From the publisher: “You and your fellow adventurers travel to Peru to find a ruined Incan temple and its treasures: turquoise, obsidian and gold. There are also rumors of valuable Incan artifacts. Will you chance dangers like giant spiders, mummies and fire during your search, or will you escape back to camp and safety, carrying out your loot?”

Ann won this game.

 

The last game we played was 7 Wonders.

The game group played this one.

7 Wonders lasts three ages. In each age, players receive seven cards from a particular deck, choose one of those cards, then pass the remainder to an adjacent player, as in Fairy Tale or a Magic: the Gathering booster draft. Players reveal their cards simultaneously, paying resources if needed or collecting resources or interacting with other players in various ways. (Players have individual boards with special powers on which to organize their cards, and the boards are double-sided as in Bauza’s Ghost Stories.) Each player then chooses another card from the deck they were passed, and the process repeats until players have six cards in play from that age. After three ages, the game ends.

In essence 7 Wonders is a card development game along the lines of Race for the Galaxy or Dominion. Some cards have immediate effects, while others provide bonuses or upgrades later in the game. Some cards provide discounts on future purchases. Some provide military strength to overpower your neighbors and others give nothing but victory points. UnlikeMagic or Fairy Tale, however, each card is played immediately after being drafted, so you’ll know which cards your neighbor is receiving and how his choices might affect what you’ve already built up. Cards are passed left-right-left over the three ages, so you need to keep an eye on the neighbors in both directions.

I won this game with 54 points.

 

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Posted by on November 6, 2011 in Games

 

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Game Night: October 27, 2011

This whole evening we played Halloween themed games.

Marcus, Ted, Brian and I played Fearsome Floors.

Fearsome Floors / Finstere Flure (or ‘Sinister Corridors’) is a game from Friedemann Friese:

The storyline attempts to continue the FFF-saga with the players trying to escape from Fürst Fieso. Story aside, what we have is a wonderful race game in which the players must move through a dungeon as fast as possible – or at least within 14 turns – before it crumbles over their heads.

This could be done in 7 turns if everything was peaceful and quiet, but unfortunately the dungeon is also the home of a very hungry monster!

Players must maneuver their disks through the dungeon trying to manipulate the movement of a monster who is always after fresh prey. Players can try to lead the monster to opponents’ pieces, but may find themselves eaten instead! Pieces might slide along blood slicks or be crushed between a boulder and a wall. You can even try to get the monster to teleport to another part of the board, where it will fall upon its next victim!

I won this game. However I think we were missing something it just did not seem to click with any of us.

The next game we played was Betrayal at the House on the Hill.

Betrayal at House on the Hill quickly builds suspense and excitement as players explore a haunted mansion of their own design, encountering spirits and frightening omens that foretell their fate. With an estimated one hour playing time, Betrayal at House on the Hill is ideal for parties, family gatherings or casual fun with friends.

Betrayal at House on the Hill is a tile game that allows players to build their own haunted house room by room, tile by tile, creating a new thrilling game board every time. The game is designed for three to six people, each of whom plays one of six possible characters.

Secretly, one of the characters betrays the rest of the party, and the innocent members of the party must defeat the traitor in their midst before it’s too late! Betrayal at House on the Hill will appeal to any game player who enjoys a fun, suspenseful, and strategic game.

Betrayal at House on the Hill includes detailed game pieces, including character cards, pre-painted plastic figures, and special tokens, all of which help create a spooky atmosphere and streamline game play.

I was the traitor and won the game beating everyone else.

It was a fairly large group that evening so there was another game being played while we played our two.

Anna, Dannis, Heidi, Allison and Eric played Fury of Dracula.

In this game of Gothic adventure, one player takes the role of Dracula while up to four others attempt to stop him by controlling Vampire hunters from the famous Bram Stoker novel.

Dracula has returned, and is determined to control all of Europe by creating an undead empire of Vampires. Dracula uses a deck of location cards to secretly travel through Europe, leaving a trail of encounters and events for the hunters that chase him.

Meanwhile, the hunters attempt to track and destroy Dracula using the limited information available to them – a task easier said than done when their prey has the power to change forms into a wolf or bat, and can even melt away into the mist when confronted.

To save Europe and rid the world of Dracula’s foul plague, the hunters must destroy Dracula before he earns enough victory points to win the game… will they have enough wit and bravery to defeat the dark count?

Anna played Dracula and lost the game, and the others were the winners.

 
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Posted by on November 6, 2011 in Games

 

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Game Night: October 20, 2011

The first game on the evening was 7 Wonders. Playing this game was Ted, Anna, Brian and myself.

7 Wonders lasts three ages. In each age, players receive seven cards from a particular deck, choose one of those cards, then pass the remainder to an adjacent player, as inFairy Tale or a Magic: the Gathering booster draft. Players reveal their cards simultaneously, paying resources if needed or collecting resources or interacting with other players in various ways. (Players have individual boards with special powers on which to organize their cards, and the boards are double-sided as in Bauza’s Ghost Stories.) Each player then chooses another card from the deck they were passed, and the process repeats until players have six cards in play from that age. After three ages, the game ends.

In essence 7 Wonders is a card development game along the lines of Race for the Galaxy or Dominion. Some cards have immediate effects, while others provide bonuses or upgrades later in the game. Some cards provide discounts on future purchases. Some provide military strength to overpower your neighbors and others give nothing but victory points. Unlike Magic or Fairy Tale, however, each card is played immediately after being drafted, so you’ll know which cards your neighbor is receiving and how his choices might affect what you’ve already built up. Cards are passed left-right-left over the three ages, so you need to keep an eye on the neighbors in both directions.

Though the box is listed as being for 3-7 players, there is an official 2-player variant included in the instructions.

Ted won the game by researching lots of science.

The second game of the evening was To Court the King.

In this game, the players are petitioners at the royal court, trying to gain the King’s favor. To do so, they must first gain the help of the servants and petty officials at the court, who can then help them gain access to the nobility, who, in turn, can help to reach the king.

The game is played in turns. On their turn, a player will gather his dice, roll them, set aside at least one, and roll the remaining dice again, until all dice have been set aside. After that, he gets to select a character who will help him. Each character requires a certain combination of dice (such as two pairs or dice that show at least 30 points). The character will give the player some benefits on later rolls, such as an additional die or the ability to modify the results of a roll.

The game ends when a player gains the support of the Queen (and temporary favor of the King, winning ties in the final roll-off). Now, all players try to gain a dice result of as many equal dice as possible (7x 2s, 8x 6s, etc). The player who gets the longest, highest result gains the favor of the King and wins.

Contents: 12 Dice, 60 character cards, 5 player aids, 1 marker, rules.

I won this game.

 

 
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Posted by on November 6, 2011 in Games, Uncategorized

 

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